Academic Programs

Fall 2014 WGS Courses

CRN

Course ID

Credit

Title

Days

Time

Place

Instructor

GEC

81883 WGS 250-01 3 Intro to Women's & Gender Studies T R 2:00.3:15 Curry 238 Sarah Cervenak GSB, WGS
81890 WGS 250-02 3 Intro to Women's & Gender Studies M W 2:00-3:15 Curry 238 Dayne Alexander GSB, WGS
An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of gender through images, roles, and status in U.S. history and culture. Special attention given to developing critical frameworks for understanding gender in society.
81935 WGS 270-01 3 Sexuality and Culture W 2:00-4:50pm SOEB 108 Elizabeth T. Walker WGS
An introduction to the academic study of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex histories, experiences, and cultures.
87878 WGS 333-01 3 Gendered Worlds T R 11:00-12:15 MHRA 2209 Danielle Bouchard GHP, GMO, GN, IGS, WGS
Explores social problems, movements, and change related to gender in specific cultural, historical, political contexts. Advances a questioning of one's position in gendered relations of power in a constantly changing world.
81939 WGS 350-01 3 Intro to Feminist Theories T R 12:30-1:45 Curry 238 Danielle Bouchard GPR, WGS
Explores and evaluates feminist theories in a socio-historical context. Raises questions about their implications for different methods of inquiry and about the nature of knowledge and rational thought.

81942 86188 86497 86500 86503 86506 86509 86512 86515 86518

WGS 400-01 WGS 400-02 WGS 400-03 WGS 400-04 WGS 400-05 WGS 400-06 WGS 400-07 WGS 400-08 WGS 400-09 WGS 400-10

1 Independent Study       H Roskelly D.Bouchard D. Gill D.Krueger E.Walker L.Villaverde L.Levenstein T.Nichols C.Schmitz J.Green WGS
Intensive independent study of specialized topics.
Many cross-appointed WGS faculty are available, See listings in UNCGenie. For more information on requirements for registration see the information posted on our website.
81950 WGS 450-01 3 Special Topics Seminar: Gender,Crime and Deviance M W 2:00-3:15pm Graham 308 Gwendolyn Hunnicutt WGS
Examines key questions in scholarly literature on gender, crime, and deviance: how gender socialization, gender roles, and institutions affect males' and females' offending, deviant behavior, and victimization.
86503 WGS 450-02 3 Sp Tpcs Sem: Gendered Frames, Embodied Camera W 6:00-8:50 Curry 309 Cybelle McFadden WGS

This course will explore the relationship between filming one’s own body and reflexive cinematic practices in a selection of work by key French female filmmakers, namely Agnès Varda, Chantal Akerman, Dominique Cabrera, Sophie Calle, and Maïwenn. By making visible their body, they offer a wider range of representation of women in French film. These filmmakers thus offer a solution to the conundrum of how to represent the female body without either erasing or objectifying it. Through avant-garde form, they transform representational content and produce new cinematic bodies with the power to influence signifying practices in contemporary French culture. By rendering visible their artistic practice and praxis and their camera in their work, these women also visually claim the role of filmmaker and creative subject. They therefore establish their authority in a film industry in which women’s participation and recognition of their achievements have historically been lower than that of their male counterparts. We will analyze how their embodiment as female filmmakers in their work gives visibility to women as filmmakers, changes meaning of women’s bodies on screen, and reassesses their status in the profession. We will also discuss feminist research methodologies and the use of feminist theory in a developing a research project. Students will have the opportunity to consider the relationship between theory and praxis as they develop their own research project in this course.

81960 WGS 460-01 3 Internship in WGS     Hephzibah Roskelly WGS
Practical experience in a variety of professional settings. Includes regular meeting with internship coordinator. Students will complete at 8-10 hours a week at an internship site for a total of 120 horus by the end of the semester. The internship will encourage students to put theories to the test of practice, explore approaches and ideas, and consider vocations. The course builds research expertise and practical experience in addition to vocational preparation. Limited enrollment. For more information on requirements for registration and for completing the internship, see the internship information posted on our website.
88495 WGS 490-02 3 WGS Senior Capstone       Elizabeth T. Walker SI,WI,WGS
Required capstone course in Women"s and Gender Studies. Each student will design and present a culminating project, and will complete and review their portfolio developed from their WGS courses.
81961 WGS 493-01 3 WGS Honors Work         HSS, WGS
Allows students to do Honors work in WGS. Through Disciplinary Honors, students have the opportunity to study topics in depth and to do original, sophistocated research under the supervision of a faculty member, thus giving themselves a competitive advantage when applying for graduate school or beginning a career.
81963 86206 86498 86501 86504 86507 86510 86513 86516 86519 86776 WGS 600-01 WGS 600-02 WGS 600-03 WGS 600-04 WGS 600-05 WGS 600-06 WGS 600-07 WGS 600-08 WGS 600-09 WGS 600-10 WGS 600-11 3-6 Independent Study       H.Roskelly D.Bouchard D.Gill D.Krueger C.McFadden L.Villaverde L.Levenstein T.Nichols C.Schmitz J.Green N.Myers WGS
A research or creative project related to women’s and gender studies supervised by a WGS faculty member. Independent study of specialized topics. Requires written plan, permission of sponsoring instructor, and approval of the Women's and Gender Studies Program director.   Many cross-appointed WGS faculty are available, see listings in UNCGenie.
81966 WGS 650-01 3 Feminist Theory: Intersections of Gender, Race and Class R 6:00-8:50 Curry 312 Danielle Bouchard WGS
Core class introduces feminist social movements across historical and global contexts. Relies on interdisciplinary lenses and epistemologies, particularly as contested identity politics intersect with other systems of power and relationships.
81967 86209 86499 86502 86505 86508 86511 86514 86517 WGS 699-01 WGS 699-02 WGS 699-03 WGS 699-04 WGS 699-05 WGS 699-06 WGS 699-07 WGS 699-08 WGS 699-09 1-6 Thesis       H.Roskelly D.Bouchard D.Gill D.Krueger C.Showden L.Villaverde L.Levenstein T.Nichols C.Schmitz WGS

 

Fall 2014 Courses in Other Programs & Departments (WGS Marker)

87756 AFS 325-01 3 Black Women in the US TR 11:00-12:15 Curry 331 Sarah J. Cervenak AFS, WGS, WI
This course explores the historical experiences of women of African descent in America through an evaluation of relevant literature, film, and/or music. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to explain the effects of racism, sexism, and class disparities on Black women and the ways these women have responded to these issues; recognize the cultural diversity of women of African descent in the United States and the impact culture has on identity and self-definition; identify and discuss experiences unique to women of African descent as expressed in their music, films, literature, and political writing; discuss the different social theories that articulate Black women’s experiences and apply them to analysis of relevant issues; and analyze the differences between issues Black women of one era faced and those faced by Black women of another era.
86625 BLS 348-11D 3 Representing Women    WEB  Ann E. Millett WGS
Focuses on women as producers, consumers, and subjects of visual culture. Examines the Feminist art movement, Feminist critiques of popular culture, and the significance of visual representation to political representation.
84348 BLS 385-01D 3 American Motherhood    WEB    Carrie Levesque WGS
Examines representations of motherhood throughout American history in the media and in scholarly and creative literature. Explores the mothering experiences of women of different races, classes, and generations.
84338 BLS 386-01D 3 Women, War & Terror    WEB  Carrie Levesque WGS
Examines women as victims and critics of war and terror in the 20th century, primarily through autobiographical writings, and explores broader questions of gender, language, power, and resistance.
84190 CED574A-01 3 Contemporary Topics: Women's Issues  T  9:00-11:50  Ferguson 248 James M. Benshoff WGS

 82781

CPS 600.01 3

Fund. of Conflict Transformation and Peace Studies

R 6:00-9:00

Stone 217

Thomas J. Martinek WGS

Introduction to the interdisciplinary theory, research, conflict analysis, and intervention strategies, which form the foundation of peace and conflict studies.

82782 CPS 601-01 3 Global Intercultural Conflict Transformation T

6:00-9:00

MHRA 2206 Cathryne L. Schmitz WGS
Explores multiple dimensions of diversity in creating and resolving conflicts. Students explore their own culture be­liefs and values as well as diverse conflict models and systems around the world.
82785 CPS 610-01 3 Conflict Transformation: Reconciliation and Healing T 6:00-9:00 MHRA 2204 Laura K. Taylor WGS
Explore nonviolent responses to conflict and violence that are oriented to the restoration of relationships damaged by crime, war, community, and workplace violence. Courses offered every spring semester:
87783 CPS 647-01 3 Negotiation and Mediation W 6:00-9:00   Roy J. Baroff WGS
Engage with negotiation and mediation practices for transforming conflict. Build from negotiation and mediation theory to strategies and tactics. Learn and apply skills.
87663 CST 659-01 3 Communication and Gendered Communities W 5:30-8:20 MHRA 1206 Loreen N. Olson WGS
Ways in which communication process constructs gendered communities. Analysis of gendered language codes, speech communities, and messages that transform community
82804 82805 87674 82807 82808 82809 82810 ELC 381-01 ELC 381-02 ELC 381-03 ELC 381-04 ELC 381-05 ELC 381-06 ELC 381-07 3 The Institution of Education M
T R
T R
T R
T R
M W
M W
4:00-6:50 9:30-10:45 9:30-10:45 11:00-12:15 11:00-12:15 2:00-3:15 2:00-3:15 SOEB 217 SOEB 215 xxxxxxxxxxx SOEB 214 SOEB 102 SOEB 214 MHRA 1208   WGS
School as a social institution concerned with transmission of ideological, moral, and cultural values; social reproduction and change; and competing philosophical visions of education with particular focus on democratic citizenship.
 80943 ELC 676-01 3 Educational Sociology:Race, Class, and Gender Power Dynamics  T  7:00-9:50  SOEB 212 Silvia Bettez WGS
Key sociological concepts and theories are utilized to analyze, critique, and understand how power operates on both micro and macro levels within United States educational systems.
 87678 ELC 682-01 3 Teaching Social Justice  W 4:00-6:50  MHRA 3204  Silvia Bettez WGS
87951 ENG 209-01 3 Nonwestern Literature: Postcolonial Development  T R 11:00-12:15 Graham 209 Alexandra S. Moore GLT GN, IGS, WGS
Variable topics, with emphasis on regional interconnections. Offerings may include South Asian Diaspora, Postcolonial Childhood, Afro-Caribbean Writers, and Australasian Writers.
 87957 ENG 347-01 3 Studies in Post 1800 Literature  MWF 10:00-10:50 Graham 424 Noelle A. Morrissette AFS, WGS
Exploration of selected topics in literature in English after 1800.
 83755 ENG 376-01 3 African American Writers after the 1920's  MWF 11:00-11:50 Graham 424 Noelle A. Morrissette AFS, WGS
Critical survey of the traditions, thought, and directions of African American writing from the late Harlem Renaissance to the present.
87971 ENG 705-01 3 Cultural Studies M 3:30-6:20 MHRA 3209 Ben Clarke WGS
Problems and topics in contemporary cultural studies; recent trends, issues, methods in the study of literature as a site of cultural, social, and political reflection. May be repeated once when topic varies.
87972 ENG 710-01 3 Studies in English Renaisance Literature M 6:30-9:20 MHRA 3207 Jennifer Feather WGS
Investigation of selected authors or topics. May be repeated once for credit when topic varies.
87974 ENG 734-01 3 Studies in American Women Writers T 3:30-6:20 MHRA 3204 Karen L. Kilcup WGS
Intensive study of a particular area of American women’s writing and affiliated critical work. May be repeated once for credit when topic varies.
 85009 FMS 142-01 3 Freshman Seminar in Philosophical, Religious, and Ethical Principles —Global Non-Western Perspectives  T R 12:30-1:45 Graham 203 Ellen D. Haskell GN, GPR, WGS, WI
Global Non-Western perspectives on the studies of the philosophical, religious, and/or ethical traditions that have shaped societies in the past and present.
 84728 FRE 693-01 3 Gendered Frames, Embodied Cameras: Feminist Theory and Research Methodology  W  6:00-8:50    Cybelle McFadden WGS

This course will explore the relationship between filming one’s own body and reflexive cinematic practices in a selection of work by key French female filmmakers, namely Agnès Varda, Chantal Akerman, Dominique Cabrera, Sophie Calle, and Maïwenn. By making visible their body, they offer a wider range of representation of women in French film. These filmmakers thus offer a solution to the conundrum of how to represent the female body without either erasing or objectifying it. Through avant-garde form, they transform representational content and produce new cinematic bodies with the power to influence signifying practices in contemporary French culture. By rendering visible their artistic practice and praxis and their camera in their work, these women also visually claim the role of filmmaker and creative subject. They therefore establish their authority in a film industry in which women’s participation and recognition of their achievements have historically been lower than that of their male counterparts. We will analyze how their embodiment as female filmmakers in their work gives visibility to women as filmmakers, changes meaning of women’s bodies on screen, and reassesses their status in the profession.We will also discuss feminist research methodologies and the use of feminist theory in a developing a research project. Students will have the opportunity to consider the relationship between theory and praxis as they develop their own research project in this course.

86790 HDF 390-02D 3 Families and Children Global Perspectives WEB     Mary Y. Morgan GN, WGS
A study of Asian, African, Latin American, and Eastern European families and children, focusing on family structure, gender roles, and socialization practices within their socioeconomic, historical, and cultural context.
80927 HDF 407-01 3 Issues Affecting Women and Families MWF 10:00-10:50 Stone 204 Mary Y. Morgan WGS
Study of cultural influences on definitions and roles of women in families and work, including impact of educational, scientific, religious, and legal institutions. Exploration of issues affecting women and families.
80929 HDF 409-01 3 Family Diversity T R 2:00-3:15 Petty 213 Andrea G. Hunter WGS
Develop an in-depth understanding of the variation within and between families through an exploration of the similarities and differences among families and children from a cultural, racial, gender, and class perspective.
 88090 HEA 333-01 3 Health of Women  WEB     Jennifer Toller Erausquin WGS
We consider how the complexities of women's lives and status influence women's health. Students will consider how research, practice, and action can all contribute to improved health for all women.
80588 HIS 208-02 3 Women and Gender World History TR  11:00-12:15 MHRA 1214 Hannah D. Shotwell GHP, GL, GMO, IGS, WGS
This course will introduce students to some of the major themes in the study of women and gender by examining continental European history in a world context. We will explore how women's experiences changed over time and differed according to location. We will also explore how concepts of gender shaped and were shaped by history. Students will learn how to analyze a variety of primary sources and evaluate historical debates. We will consider how looking at women and gender changes our understanding of history and sheds light on contemporary global politics.
82646 HSS 108-01 3 Intersections in Women's Lives T R 12:30-1:45   Elizabeth T. Walker GSB, HSS, WGS, WI
The phrase, “The personal is political,” was coined in the 1970s to reflect an important awareness of women’s lives that led not only to women’s rights movements, but to many other social justice movements as well. With a background of human rights, we will use novels with settings ranging from early biblical times to the 21st Century to explore how women’s lives and bodies have been caught in the intersection of the personal and political in historical and cultural contexts.
88405 JNS 230-01 3 Women in Japanese Literature and Film T R 11:00-12:15 Bryan 110   GLT, GN, IGS, SI, WGS
The course focuses on various aspects of women’s lives in modern Japanese society, providing an overview of modern Japanese society through representation of women’s culture in literature and film.
87858  KIN 632-01 3 Sport and Society: Global and Ethnic Relations  W 2:00-4:50    Katherine M. Jamieson WGS
Structural and ideological dimensions of international, national, and local sport. Analysis of the political economy of sport, including colonialism, neo-colonialism, national identities, and social movements.
83136 MLS 620-03D 3 Topics: Global Human Rights WEB     Alexandra S. Moore WGS
The Center for Universal Justice and Dignity, a grassroots, intensely focused, and highly respected international human rights organization, provides the context for this course. MALS students will become trainees with the fictional Center to develop human rights investigation and critical reporting skills.The Center trains human rights monitors around the world and provides educational resources for schools, government organizations, and NGOs. It is divided into five functional units that focus research and education into the following investigative areas: women and children; peace, safety, and security; health and education; economic justice; and the rights of prisoners and detainees. Trainees (MALS graduate students) will develop critical familiarity with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, its historical antecedents in the U.S.Bill of Rights and the French Rights of Man, and explore the theoretical, cultural, and political foundations of these documents. They will also consider critiques of human rights in terms of its claims of universality and the ways in which human rights is mobilized in specific contexts.
87693  MST 325-01 3 Gender and Media Culture  M W 1:00-1:50  Brown 215  Emily D. Edwards WGS, WI
Examination of the nature of media contents and production processes as they influence the construction of feminine and masculine identities.
88616 PCS 305-01 3 Foundation of Peace and Conflict Studies F 12:00-3:00 Stone 186 Emily M. Janke IGS, WGS
This course surveys the basic practical and theoretical foundations of peace and conflict transformation. The basic theories of conflict transformation provide a framework for understanding the dynamics of practice.
88620  PCS 309-01 3 Conflict and Culture  W 11:00-1:30 Stone 186   IGS,, WGS,
Critical multiculturalism provides the framework for exploring multiple dimensions of diversity and its impact on creating and transforming conflicts. The impact of cultural interactions is a core focus.
88721 PCS 505-01 3 Environmental Justice M 6:00-9:00 MHRA 2204 Cathryne L. Schmitz WGS
86371 PHI 301-01 3 Philosophy of Race and Gender WEB     Janine C. Jones WGS, WI
Philosophy of Race and Gender provides historical background for understanding racial inequalities; it focuses on the concepts of race and gender and how they are connected to racism and sexism, and explores the concept of intersectionality in order to examine the problem of interlocking oppressions. Students are expected to aim to effectively communicate thoughts, ideas, and concepts through written assignments and classroom participation.
86616 RCO 224-01 3 Sense and Sensuality in Women M W 11:00-12:15 Guilford 119 William J. Dodson GL, GLT, WGS, WI
86050 REL 382-01 3 Topics in Christian Thought: Blood T 6:00-8:50 Foust 111 Eugene F. Rogers WGS, WI
This course covers Christian theology of blood and its sociology. In Christianity, blood both cleanses and defiles. It marks community membership (the blood of the eucharist). A recurring theme will be how the language of blood reinforces gender roles. Other topics will include blood in sacrifice, blood and theories of sin, blood and the incarnation (if Christ had human blood, did he have primate blood, and if so what would it mean?), blood and kinship roles, blood and contagion, blood and sexuality, blood in other religions. Readings will come from theorists of religion including Emile Durkheim, Mary Douglas, Nancy Jay, and Cleo Kearns; from Christian theologians, such as Anselm of Canterbury, Thomas Aquinas, and others; and from historians including David Biale and Caroline Bynum. The reading will be difficult. Here is a sample of what we will talk about.
80663 SOC 225-01 3 Race, Class and Gender: Social Inequality MWF 9:00-9:50 Graham 302 Joyce F. Clapp WGS
Study of social inequalities, with a particular focus on race, class, and gender.
80803 SOC 419-01 3 Gender, Crime and Deviance M W 2:00-3:15 Graham 308 Gwen Hunnicutt SI, WGS
Examines key questions in scholarly literature on gender, crime, and deviance: how gender socialization, gender roles, and institutions affect males' and females' offending, deviant behavior, and victimization.
87653 SOC 601-01 3 Gender Violence W 6:00-8:50 Graham 203 Gwen Hunnicutt WGS
 
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